The Use of Camouflaged Cell Phone Towers for a Quality Urban Environment

Koya City as a Case Study

  • Salah I. Yahya (1) Department of Software Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Koya University, Danielle Mitterrand Boulevard, Koya KOY45, Kurdistan Region - F.R. Iraq. (2) Department of Computer Science and Engineering, School of Science and Engineering, University of Kurdistan Hewler, Erbil, Kurdistan Region - F.R. Iraq. http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2724-5118
Keywords: Base station, Cell phone tower, Cell Tower Proliferation, Tower disguising, Tree tower, Urban development

Abstract

The widespread use of cell phones has led to cell phone towers being located in many communities. These towers, also called base stations, incorporate electronic equipment and antennas that receive and transmit radiofrequency signals. Along with the towers, used for TV and line of sight microwave communication, the proliferation of these base stations is having a detrimental effect on urban esthetics. It is highly recommended for developing urban areas to consider the problem of these unsightly towers as a form of visual pollution, which increases in parallel with the rise of human population density, and also, the possible electromagnetic field (EMF) hazard due to the existence of the cell phone towers in the residential areas. This paper presents the feasibility of using camouflaged cell phone towers to improve the quality of the urban environment. Cell phone towers disguised as trees might address the visual pollution, while, at the same time, might also mitigate the possible EMF hazard by installing these disguised towers in free spaces, rather than on the roof of buildings, schools, hospitals, etc. The feasibility of implementing such a scenario for a quality urban environment in Koya city is discussed.

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Author Biography

Salah I. Yahya, (1) Department of Software Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Koya University, Danielle Mitterrand Boulevard, Koya KOY45, Kurdistan Region - F.R. Iraq. (2) Department of Computer Science and Engineering, School of Science and Engineering, University of Kurdistan Hewler, Erbil, Kurdistan Region - F.R. Iraq.

Dr. Salah I. Yahya is a Professor (Full), joined the department of Software Engineering at Koya University in 2010. He has a B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering, M.Sc. degree in Electronics and Communication Engineering and Ph.D. degree in Communication and Microwave Engineering. He is a Consultant at the Iraqi Engineering Union. Dr. Yahya has many scientific publications; (2) books [1] and [2], (13) Journal Articles and more than (31) conference papers. He is a senior member of the IEEE-USA and a member of AMTA-USA, SDIWC-Hong Kong. Dr. Yahya is a regular reviewer of the Electromagnetics Academy, Cambridge, USA, PIERS Journals publications, since 2009, Science and Engineering of Composite Materials journal and International Journal of Applied Electromagnetics and Mechanics, as well as, a regular reviewer of SDIWC conferences. His h-index is (7). (see TAP). He joined the University of Kurdistan Hewler as an Academic Expert Since 2017.

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Published
2019-05-22
How to Cite
Yahya, S. (2019, May 22). The Use of Camouflaged Cell Phone Towers for a Quality Urban Environment. UKH Journal of Science and Engineering, 3(1), 29-34. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.25079/ukhjse.v3n1y2019.pp29-34
Section
Research Articles