Influence of Teacher-Student Relationships on Students’ Loneliness in Coeducational and Single-Gender Public Secondary Schools in Kenya: a case of Murang’a County

  • Baru Peter Muriuki Department of Education, School of Education and Social Sciences, Karatina university, Karatina, Kenya
  • Zachariah Kariuki Department of Education, School of Education and Social Sciences, Karatina university, Karatina, Kenya
  • Lucy Ndegwa Department of Education, School of Education, Karatina university, Karatina, Kenya.
  • Johannes Njoka Department of Education, School of Education and Social Sciences, Karatina university, Karatina, Kenya.
Keywords: coeducational, Gender, Loneliness, students, Teacher-Student Relationships

Abstract

The objective of this study was to establish the influence of teacher-student relationship on loneliness among secondary school students. The study was carried out in sub county public schools in Murang’a County, central region of Kenya. A cross sectional survey design was used. Stratified random sampling was used to get a sample of 592 participants from eight sub counties in Murang’a County. Loneliness was measured using Perth aloneness loneliness scale (PALs) while teacher-student relationship (TSR) was measured using ten statements with graded responses in a five point Likert scale developed for this study. The PAL and TSR scales together with personal data questions formed sections of self administered questionnaire. Administration of the questionnaire was done during normal school days by research assistants. The data was coded and analyzed using statistic program for social sciences (SPSS) version 20. Findings were that TSR was inversely and highly significantly related to loneliness. Regression analysis revealed that TSR predicts 16.2% of loneliness among students. The results are discussed in relation to implications in teacher training curriculum and loneliness counseling in schools.

Key words: Teacher, Students,  Relationships, Loneliness. .Kenya

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Author Biographies

Baru Peter Muriuki, Department of Education, School of Education and Social Sciences, Karatina university, Karatina, Kenya

Baru Peter is a Phd student in educational psychology at the Department of Education, School of Education and Social Sciences, Karatina university, Karatina, Kenya.

Zachariah Kariuki, Department of Education, School of Education and Social Sciences, Karatina university, Karatina, Kenya

Mr. Zachariah  is currently a lecturer at the Department of Education, School of Education and Social Sciences, Karatina university, Karatina, Kenya.

Lucy Ndegwa, Department of Education, School of Education, Karatina university, Karatina, Kenya.

Mr. Zachariah  is currently a lecturer  and the Head of  Education department, School of Education and Social Sciences, Karatina university, Karatina, Kenya.

Johannes Njoka, Department of Education, School of Education and Social Sciences, Karatina university, Karatina, Kenya.

Mr. Johannes  is currently filling the position of a lecturer at the Department of Education, School of Education and Social Sciences, Karatina university in Karatina, Kenya

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Published
2020-06-30
How to Cite
Muriuki, B., Kariuki, Z., Ndegwa, L., & Njoka, J. (2020, June 30). Influence of Teacher-Student Relationships on Students’ Loneliness in Coeducational and Single-Gender Public Secondary Schools in Kenya: a case of Murang’a County. UKH Journal of Social Sciences, 4(1), 50-57. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.25079/ukhjss.v4n1y2020.pp50-57
Section
Research Articles